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New Nikon patent shows a mirrorless camera CMOS global shutter with dual pixel autofocus

Nikon is working on the holy grail of mirrorless system camera sensor tech. In the newly published patent application (submitted in January 2018)  they present a new sensor:

In order to realize a global shutter in a CMOS image sensor, there is known an imaging apparatus in which a storage section is provided to a pixel.

Moreover the sensor has on sensor phase detection pixels similar to Canon’s dual pixel tech.If Nikon can really translate this into their new FF mirrorless it would certainly mark a quantum leap over current Sony’s.

 

Nikon manager confirms the new mirrorless cameras will hit the market in Spring 2019

In an interview with the Japanese TV network NHK Nikon confirmed that their new High End Mirrorless System camera(s) will hit the market in Spring 2019.

There is yet no reliable rumor about the possible specs. But our best guess is this:

1) Nikon will announce an entry level FF mirrorless first
2) It will obviously have a new mount and be fully AF compatible with existing F-mount lenses with the new Nikon adapter
3) It will have a new 30+ Megapixel sensor with PDAF

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0qYXY3jPG8

Nikon patents a new kind of image stabilization system

There is abrand new Nikon patent application that shows a new way of creating an in camera stabilization system.

Currently Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, Ricoh and Fuji do implement mechanism to stabilize the entire sensor. In this patent Nikon has a different approch. The sensor stays fixed while the lens array on top of the pixels is moving on four axis to stabilize the image. On the images you can see the lens array marked with the number 202.

Nikon writes:

The LF camera 100 of this embodiment is endowed with a VR (Vibration Reduction) function that suppresses influence of shaking (so called “camera-shaking”) generated when image capture is performed while the camera is being held by hand. 

 

Let’s see if this is something we are going to see implemented in a future mirrorless camera. Of course, this is only a patent for now which is no guarantee that we will ever see this tech used on any camera.